A Manhattan art gallery done up to resemble a rundown Chinatown business is angering some in the community who see it as racist and offensive.

The controversy centers on the James Cohan Gallery on the Lower East Side, not far from Chinatown. Omer Fast, a Berlin-based artist, redid the inside and facade to resemble “what they were like before gentrification,” according to a press release on the gallery’s website.

That includes a yellow awning with faded English and Chinese characters in red, folding chairs arranged on a scuffed-up floor with mismatched linoleum tiles, red lanterns hanging from the ceiling, and a grocery cart with a black plastic bag tied to it.

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New York's Manhattan Chinatown. A gallery in the neighboring Lower East Side is being criticized for an installation some critics have called "racist" and "poverty porn." Maremagnum / Getty Images

“In that creation, he chose visual signifiers that involved making purposeful holes and dents in the wall, broken furniture, broken ATMs, graffiti, and a place of general filth,” Liz Moy, core member of the Chinatown Art Brigade, which protested at the space this past weekend, told NBC News.

“That is something that has been used to characterize Chinatown throughout its history as a way to keep it from getting resources,” she added.

The James Cohan Gallery, in a statement to NBC News, defended Fast’s remodeling for his exhibition, which features a 15-minute, 3D digital fictional film entitled “August.” The film is inspired by the life and work of August Sander, a famous German portrait photographer in the early 20th century.

READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE here: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/chinatown-activists-criticize-art-installation-called-racist-poverty-porn-n812361